experimental beers with a botanical twist

coriander seed

Coriandrum sativum (but not the leaf). Given that it was cultivated in ancient Egypt, it’s probably been something that brewers have added to beer almost from the beginning. “Roasting or heating the seeds in a dry pan heightens the flavour, aroma, and pungency. Ground coriander seed loses flavour quickly in storage and is best ground fresh. … Coriander seeds are used in brewing certain styles of beer, particularly some Belgian wheat beers. The coriander seeds are used with orange peel to add a citrus character.” (Wikipedia)

Belgian Gale Ale

Belgian Gale Ale

Sweet gale or bog myrtle is a classic northern European gruit ingredient.

Ginger-Angelica Gruit Porter

Ginger-Angelica Gruit Porter

Fennel, licorice, lemon balm, coriander… YUM. A delicious backdrop to a delicious beer.

Ground Ivy Gruit Ale

Ground Ivy Gruit Ale

I’ve never found ground ivy to be anywhere near as bitter as the books say, but it could be the wild stuff I use tastes different from British or cultivated varieties.

Calaguala Ale

Calaguala Ale

Calaguala, A.K.A. samambaia, is a tropical fern with many healing properties. Combined with cinchona bark — herbal quinine — this ought to be “good for what ales you.”